Update on Naked Mountain Bryophytes

Drummondia prorepens - a tree moss growing on branch of Eastern Red Cedar in barrens on Naked Mountain

Drummondia prorepens – a tree moss growing on branch of Eastern Red Cedar in barrens on Naked Mountain

I know there are a lot of Bryophyte lovers out there!  My facebook post about the visit last November by three field scientists who were collecting and documenting mosses, liverworts, hornworts and lichens in the Naked Mountain Natural Area Preserve got the most views of all of my facebook posts yet — 240!  Impressive! (See the November 26th post, Bryophytes:  A Whole New Tiny World of Wonder!)

John Townsend, Botanist with the Natural Heritage Division of the Virginia Department of Conservation and Recreation and Tom Wieboldt, Curator of the Herbarium at Virginia Polytechnic Institute sent me their findings a couple of months later.  And here they are:

  • Ceratodon purpureus – moss
  • Dicranum flagellare – moss
  • Polytrichum pallidisetum – moss
  • Frullania brittoniae (liverwort) w/ Leucodon julaceus , Haplohymenium triste (both mosses)
  • Frullania ericoides – liverwort
  • Frullania inflata – liverwort
  • Schistidium cf. apocarpum – moss
  • Reboulia hemispaerica – liverwort
  • Drummondia prorepens – moss
  • Bryum pseudotriquetrum  – moss
  • Atrichum angustatum – moss
  • Cephaloziella hampeana  – liverwort
  • Philonotis Fontana – moss
  • Ptychomitrium incurvum – moss
  • Riccia beyrichiana  – liverwort
  • Porella platyphylla  – liverwort
  • Dermatocarpon species? – lichen
  • Asterella tenella (still need to confirm ID) – liverwort
  • Thelia asprella – moss
  • Coccocarpia palmicola – lichen
  • Leptogium austroamericanum – lichen

John’s comment about these species is that none are particularly “odd” (read rare) which may relate to the habitat of Naked Mountain and particularly, the two natural communities where he and Tom collected:  near the summit and in the low elevation basic outcrop barrens. You can read about the barrens, which constitute a rare natural community and an important reason Naked Mountain is a Virginia natural area preserve here. Although the summit of Naked Mountain is often encased in foggy mist as it was the morning these folks arrived, it is generally a dry ridge habitat. And the barrens are a rocky, open outcrop with thin soils that seep in the spring, but dry up in the heat of the summer. Both are tough environments for most bryophytes and limit the number of species that can survive there.

For vascular species, be sure and check out the new Plant List page for Naked Mountain on the menu bar.  Coming soon:  a report on the natural communities that occur on Naked Mountain. The extensive mapping was done last summer by the ecological team at the Division of Natural Heritage. They identified ten discrete natural communities. Stay tuned!